Highbrowandbeard

Beards, Books, Buddhism.
busyprocrabating:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.
Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

“Names have power, so let us speak of hers. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and she is Pashtun" [x]

busyprocrabating:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.

Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

Names have power, so let us speak of hers. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and she is Pashtun" [x]

(Source: madfuture, via omgaypostmodernism)

If I overreach myself for love, it is because I crave it so much, and have known so little of it. Love as perhaps an opiate; but I know it to be creative as well.

—Allen Ginsberg, from a letter to Jack Kerouac (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via englishmajorinrepair)

[In Society Must Be Defended], we are privy to Foucault’s grappling with what I take to be one of the hallmark features of his work: not only a search for the discontinuities of history as so many commentators have claimed, but a more challenging analytic concern with the tension between rupture and reinscription, between break and recuperation in discursive formations.

Ann Laura Stoler, “Toward a Genealogy of Racisms: The 1976 Lectures at the Collège de France,” Race and the Education of Desire: Foucault’s History of Sexuality and the Colonial Order of Things, pg.61

(via bemusedbibliophile)

(via feelingpolitical)

  • I have a house and it is in a forest and I will be responding to the moniker The Wood Nymph henceforth.
oupacademic:


Chronologically, the first wave began with three initial complaints at the very end of February 1692, all involving residents of Salem Village. the number of accusations slowly increased, adding only four more victims throughout the month of March, making a total of seven accusation for the one-month period beginning a the end of February. But the outbreak escalated in April, with twenty-three new cases, and in May, with an additional thirty-nine charges. By the end of May, sixty-nine accused witches had been named and, likely, examined and jailed for further legal consideration.

Find out more in “The Long and Short of Salem Witchcraft” from the Journal of Social History. 
Image: ”Witch Hill” or “The Salem Martyr” by Thomas Slatterwhite Noble, 1869. Collection of the New York Historical Society. CC-BY-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

oupacademic:

Chronologically, the first wave began with three initial complaints at the very end of February 1692, all involving residents of Salem Village. the number of accusations slowly increased, adding only four more victims throughout the month of March, making a total of seven accusation for the one-month period beginning a the end of February. But the outbreak escalated in April, with twenty-three new cases, and in May, with an additional thirty-nine charges. By the end of May, sixty-nine accused witches had been named and, likely, examined and jailed for further legal consideration.

Find out more in “The Long and Short of Salem Witchcraft” from the Journal of Social History

Image: ”Witch Hill” or “The Salem Martyr” by Thomas Slatterwhite Noble, 1869. Collection of the New York Historical Society. CC-BY-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Knowledge is strong but love is sweet.—

—Gerard Manley Hopkins, “A Voice from the World,” The Major Works (ed. Catherine Phillips)

(Source: days-of-reading)

Your comfort is as sharp as swords;
And I cry out for wounded love.

—Gerard Manley Hopkins, “A Voice from the World,” The Major Works (ed. Catherine Phillips)

(Source: days-of-reading)

ourpresidents:

Happy Birthday President Clinton!
Here’s a list of Bill Clinton’s favorite books, in alphabetical order by author:
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou.
The Denial of Death, Ernest Becker.
Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-63, Taylor Branch.
Living History, Hillary Rodham Clinton.
Lincoln, David Herbert Donald.
Four Quartets, T.S. Eliot.
Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison.
The Way of the World: From the Dawn of Civilizations to the Eve of the Twenty-First Century, David Fromkin.
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez.
The Cure at Troy: A Version of Sophocles’ Philoctetes, Seamus Heaney.
King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed,Terror,and Heroism in Colonial Africa,Adam Hochschild.
The Imitation of Christ, Thomas à Kempis.
Meditations, Marcus Aurelius.
Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics, Reinhold Niebuhr.
Homage to Catalonia, George Orwell.
The Evolution of Civilizations: An Introduction to Historical Analysis, Carroll Quigley.
The Confessions of Nat Turner, William Styron.
Politics as a Vocation, Max Weber.
You Can’t Go Home Again, Thomas Wolfe.
Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, Robert Wright.
The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats, William Butler Yeats.
Photo: President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore view the Constitution of the United States in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom at the National Archives.  Washington, DC.  7/19/95.
-from the Clinton Library

ourpresidents:

Happy Birthday President Clinton!

Here’s a list of Bill Clinton’s favorite books, in alphabetical order by author:

  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou.
  • The Denial of Death, Ernest Becker.
  • Parting the Waters: America in the King Years 1954-63, Taylor Branch.
  • Living History, Hillary Rodham Clinton.
  • Lincoln, David Herbert Donald.
  • Four Quartets, T.S. Eliot.
  • Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison.
  • The Way of the World: From the Dawn of Civilizations to the Eve of the Twenty-First Century, David Fromkin.
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez.
  • The Cure at Troy: A Version of Sophocles’ Philoctetes, Seamus Heaney.
  • King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed,Terror,and Heroism in Colonial Africa,Adam Hochschild.
  • The Imitation of Christ, Thomas à Kempis.
  • Meditations, Marcus Aurelius.
  • Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics, Reinhold Niebuhr.
  • Homage to Catalonia, George Orwell.
  • The Evolution of Civilizations: An Introduction to Historical Analysis, Carroll Quigley.
  • The Confessions of Nat Turner, William Styron.
  • Politics as a Vocation, Max Weber.
  • You Can’t Go Home Again, Thomas Wolfe.
  • Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny, Robert Wright.
  • The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats, William Butler Yeats.

Photo: President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore view the Constitution of the United States in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom at the National Archives.  Washington, DC.  7/19/95.

-from the Clinton Library