Highbrowandbeard

Beards, Books, Buddhism.

Some will say that all we have are the pleasures of this moment, but we must never settle for that minimal transport; we must dream and enact new and better pleasures, other ways of being in the world, and ultimately new worlds.

—José Esteban Muñoz, Cruising Utopia (via alanreedwrite)

To accept loss is to accept queerness - or more accurately, to accept the loss of heteronormativity, authorization, and entitlement. To be lost is not to hide in a closet or to perform a simple (ontological) disappearing act; it is to veer away from heterosexuality’s path. Freedmen escaping slavery got lost too, and this is salient reverberation between queerness and racialization. At this historical moment, one that can be described as being characterized by encroaching assimilationist ideology in the mainstream gay and lesbian movement, some gays and lesbians want to be found on a normative map of the world. Being lost, in this particular queer sense, is to relinquish one’s role (and subsequent privilege) in the heteronormative order. The dispossessd are appropriately adept at critiquing possession as illogical. to accept the way in which one is lost is to be found and not found in a particularly queer fashion.

Gesture, Ephemera, and Queer Feeling

Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity, Jose Esteban Munoz

(via roomtopia)

I have proposed a different understanding of melancholia that does not see it as a pathology or as a self-absorbed mood that inhibits activism. Rather, it is a mechanism that helps us (re)construct identity and take our dead with us to the various battles we must wage in their names- and in our names.

—José Esteban Muñoz, Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics.  

Rest in peace, 
José  (via nica-nopal)

CAN WE TALK ABOUT HOW I CAN’T AFFORD TO BUY THE BOOKS WRITTEN BY DEAN SPADE AND JOSE MUNOZ AND HALF OF THE OTHER SCHOLARS WHO ARE WRITING FOR ME, ABOUT ME, WITH WORDS THAT I ALSO USE FOR MYSELF, THAT I HAD TO FIGHT FOR TO BE ABLE TO USE FOR MYSELF?

ghasedeh:

those goddamn books cost a fucking fortune, and there are whiteass college students and PhD candidates buying them to read about me, as though we live on the page to be consumed by them.





i hate how insidious capitalism can be to my broke ass.

I began a project of butching up, even though that is not what I understood it to be back then. I tried to avoid the fact that heterogender was a space I was strangely on the outside of - I was a spy in the house of gender normativity, and like any spy, I was extremely careful and worried that my cover would be blown. I did not understand that as long as I tried to ape the movements of heterosexuality, hardly anyone would even try to see through the facade because those around me did not want to believe in fairies. As long as I played the game, I was relatively safe.

—José Esteban Muñoz: Cruising Utopia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity (via aemlai)

Going to the library gives people the same kick as getting a raise does — a £1,359 ($2,282) raise, to be exact — according to a study commissioned by the U.K.’s Department for Culture, Media & Sport.

There we have it. Ray Bradbury knew that. Pair with this photographic love letter to libraries.  (via explore-blog)

In some ways, the term “pansexual” came out of biphobia and a need to stipulate that one was not transphobic. If you take the binary view of “bisexual,” then a sexuality specific to an attraction to men and women could be seen as being noninclusive of transgender men and women. On the other hand, transgender men and women want to (and should) be seen as simply men and women, meaning that they would/should be included in that very binary; not including them tends to be much more phobic and noninclusive.

Then there is the thought that the binary view of bisexuality can be seen as phobic of anyone who identifies as genderqueer, or somewhere along the gender and sexuality spectrum, not identifying as male or female, man or woman. But, as I mentioned before, the true definition of “bisexual” is being attracted to those who are the same as me and those who are different from me, encompassing all genders and identities. The often-repeated argument that “bi means two” ignores a simple fact: “Same” and “different” are, indeed, two groups.

uispeccoll:

MFK (Mary Frances Kennedy) Fisher (1908-1992) was a famous American food author.  Her writing style is a delightful amalgamation of memoir, travel, and food literature.  Her personal experiences and travels to Europe helped create her identity as an approachable and relatable chef.  Her recipes do not emulate fine restaurants, but are simple and elegant.  Her book How to Cook a Wolf was one of her most successful.  First published in 1942 during the World War II food shortage, Fisher wrote about how to make food economically and how to enjoy it.  In his 1942 review of the book, Orville Prescott of the New York Times wrote:

“Cook books are indisputably indispensable for the welfare of the human race, and they sell very nicely (Fannie Farmer’s ”Boston Cook Book” some 2,040,000 copies). […] Few indeed have any claims to literary merit. At least, few did until a knowing lady who signs herself austerely M. F. K. Fisher began conducting her one-woman revolution in the field of literary cookery. Mrs. Fisher writes about food with such relish and enthusiasm that the mere reading of her books creates a clamorous appetite. She also writes with a robust sense of humor and a nice capacity for a neatly turned phrase. […] Her chapter titles themselves are gems that provoke an irresistible desire to find out just what on earth she means by them: ”How to Distribute Your Virtue,” ”How to Boil Water,” ”How to Greet the Spring,” ”How to Be Cheerful Through Starving” ”How to Pray for Peace,” ”How to Be Content With a Vegetable Love” and ”How to Have a Sleek Pelt.” “ (“Books of the Times”)

-Jillian P.

Szathmary Collection TX715 .F542 1942

The totalitarian-ideological class in power is the power of a topsy-turvy world: the stranger it is, the more it claims not to exist, and its force serves above all to affirm its nonexistence.

—Guy Debord, Society Of The Spectacle (via foucault-the-haters)

Forget condom breaking, thinking your house has been broken into during sex is terrifying. Particularly when you think the guy behind *you* is behind *it*.

peircelouise:

"The feeling of desperation and unhappiness are more useful to an artist than the feeling of contentment, because desperation and unhappiness stretch your whole sensibility." — Francis Bacon

I love that top painting

(Source: post-impressionisms, via thetotesawkysquirtle)